Why you should treat yourself to an Indoor Plant!



Indoor plants have become pretty trendy lately, and we get it. They brighten and liven up a space instantly and are pretty simple to take care of. But did you know that having an indoor plant also helps to remove chemicals that may be present in your space? Chemicals typically found in cleaning products and bug spray become airborne and stay in your space even days after using your products. Indoor plants remove pollutants from the air by absorbing these gases through their leaves and roots through a process called ‘phytoremediation’. That’s pretty neat! And to throw another scientific term at you, through ‘photosynthesis’ they convert the carbon dioxide that we exhale into oxygen. Happy lungs, happy body, happy planet!
Here is a list of indoor plants that we particularly fancy because A) they’re pretty, and B) they’re all really easy to take care of:

PEACE LILY
Watering:
These plants LOVE water. Once a week, sit your Peace Lily in a bath (or sink) and douse it with water and let it sit until it’s drained. In some cases, especially during the summer, you may need to water it more. Stick your finger in the potting mix to check if soil is wet. If not, give it another good watering. You can use a spray bottle to spray the leaves with water every couple of days, too. This technique replicates its natural humid environment in which it thrives.

Sunlight:
The Peace Lily loves shade! Keep it out of direct sunlight as its leaves can brown easily. It can actually survive in a pitch black room!

Pets & Your Plant:
The Peace Lily isn’t deadly to animals (phew), but the flowers can be harmful to pets if eaten in large doses. So to keep on the safe side, keep your plant away from your pet by placing it on a bench or in a plant holder instead of on the ground.

Re-potting:
There’s actually no need to re-pot your Peace Lily straight away. You can keep it in its plastic pot and place it in another pot (this also allows it to drain better). That being said, it is best to re-pot your Peace Lily to a bigger pot once a year, ideally in spring, as this is when it really flourishes. 

FIDDLE LEAF

Watering:
Stick your finger in the potting mix and if it is dry to touch, it is time for a good watering. Sit your plant in the bath or in a sink to allow excess water to drain. Once it’s drained, place it where it usually lives. Leave it until the next time the dirt feels dry, probably just over a week to 2 weeks. 

Sunlight:
Fiddle Leaf plants love a light and sunny position. Avoid dark corners, and direct contact with air conditioners and heaters. Dust prevents the plant from absorbing sunlight, so dust its leaves with a wet cloth every week or two.
 
Pets & Your Plant:
The Fiddle Leaf is marginally toxic to pets. It is the sap and leaves that are poisonous to our furry friends, when ingested in large doses. 
 
Re-potting
Fiddle Leaf plants have big roots, so keep it in a big pot to allow the roots to have enough space to absorb water and nutrients. Winter is a good time to re-pot. Pots should be 10cm more in diameter than the plant (30cm plant = 40cm pot). If you want your Fiddle Leaf to grow even taller, it is essential to re-pot it every year. It is okay to keep it in the same size pot if you want to keep it smaller, it is just super important to keep on top of watering and fertilising.

MONSTERA

Watering:
Water your Monstera until the top soil is soaked and water is draining through the bottom of the pot. Wait until the top of the soil is completely dry before giving another good watering.

Sunlight:
Monstera’s like to be kept in a well-lit room, but not directly in sunlight as the leaves go brown and burn easily. Keep away from heaters, air conditioners, and fans to avoid dehydrating the leaves. They will grow slower if kept in a shadier position.

Pets & Your Plant :
Monstera’s aren’t deadly to your pets, but are only mildly toxic. How your pet is affected is entirely dependent on the amount consumed, but if consumed in large doses, it can cause an upset stomach. You know your pet and their tendencies, but if you feel you need to stay on the safe side, keep the plant above ground or out of your pet’s way.

Re-potting:
It is fine to keep your Monstera in the pot that you purchased it in, but if you want to encourage it to grow taller, you’ll need to transfer it to a bigger pot. Its new pot should be a few cm’s bigger in diameter than its original pot. Plant it in a pot with well-draining soil and drainage holes to prevent it getting wet feet. Monstera’s typically outgrow their pot every two years.

Love Sofia x

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